Burger King Unleashes the Halloween Whopper

But there’s more to its new spooky look than meets the eye.

We have to hand it to the team. Burger King has been doing everything it can to make a splash on social media. From smart mascot placement to the recent stint with long-time rival McDonald’s, its viral marketing strategies have been effective in gaining the public’s attention. And it seems there’s no shortage of ideas.
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Marketing Teams Failing to Provide Multicultural Marketing Initiatives

Surprisingly only 55% of CEO’s believe in the importance of multicultural marketing initiatives. Both CEO’s and Executive boards have failed to fund any efforts towards marketing for their non-white consumers.

Although Hispanic consumers may hold $1.5 trillion in buying power, half of U.S. marketers have failed to establish multicultural marketing initiatives within their organizations, according to a new report.

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How To Foster Diversity At Events

As the country continues to get more diverse, it has become increasingly important for brands to understands how to speak to the shifting audience. As companies begin to embrace MMXLII and diversity, consumers have taken notice of the brands that speak directly to them and are developing brand loyalty to these progressive companies.

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Cashmere Agency Hosts Fast Company’s Creativity Counter-Conference

Fast Company held their first-ever gathering in Los Angeles to cast a lens on the impact and importance of creativity in business, technology, design and entertainment. Cashmere Agency was one of the host locations in the Playa Vista neighborhood and held a discussion panel on the importance of embracing diversity when marketing to the Millennial demographic. On the panel were Ryan Ford, EVP & CCO; Ted Chung, Founder of Cashmere Agency; Nick Adler, VP of Business Development and Rona Mercado, VP of Marketing, Client Services. Click here for more info on #FCLA.

Millennials, Millennials, Millennials…

Millennials in the workforce have been juxtaposed as brilliant, innovative, lazy and entitled all in the same sentence. In a recent Forbes article, it weighs the pros and cons of this generation that brands target the most. Millennials set trends are social media whizzes.

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Cashmere Agency Founder Ted Chung Talks About Diversity In Marketing

Today, Cashmere Agency founder Ted Chung was featured in Billboard’s “Corner Office” feature. The article touches on Ted’s keen foresight as a fearless business leader and industry veteran, and dives into the strategy behind Cashmere’s multifaceted PR and marketing campaigns geared toward multicultural millennials. His fascinating insight into how businesses and brands will focus their marketing efforts going forward are definitely worth your time. Check out the article here!

The Grammy Conundrum

As hip-hop culture grows more diverse in voice and representation, the Grammys seem slow to catch up. The genre easily boasts several vibrant subgenres and possible spinoff styles of music. They might even deserve categories of their own. But during the industry’s most recognizable awards show, all artists who rap are lumped into the same lane. In this day and age, that’s akin to lumping all singers into the same genre just because they sing. Alas, it seems that hip-hop still may have miles to go before being fully recognized as more than just “rap music” in the eyes of those handing out the coveted golden gramophone. But who’s really responsible for this? Read More →

What Pepsi Discovered by Monitoring Millennials During the VMAs

During the VMAs, Facebook was the most popular social media brand, accounting for 41 percent of consumer usage, followed by Twitter with 32 percent.

As a brand that has long had event sponsorship at the heart of its marketing formula, Pepsi sought a more scientific way to study the correlation between TV viewing and second-screen usage during live programming.

So using research methods such as biometrics, the brand looked at consumer behavior during the MTV Video Music Awards telecast this past August—the top-rated entertainment program on cable among viewers aged 12-34 this year, and the most social non-sports TV event.

What emerged were some surprising differences in media usage among millennials. During pivotal moments of the show—like Miley Cyrus’ twerk-tastic duet with Robin Thicke (which generated a record 360,000 tweets per minute)—consumers 18-26 immediately shifted from TV viewing to second screens. Meanwhile, those aged 27-34 stayed with the telecast, waiting to engage in social conversations.

“The younger group already had their hands ready and immediately went to social media to start talking,” said Chad Stubbs, senior director of marketing at PepsiCo.

“The show ebbed and flowed, and a key thing we learned was having a brand message throughout the show was important,” he added. “In the past, maybe we said we would need a big part at the beginning or the end.”

Carolyn Kim, associate director of business intelligence at Pepsi agency OMD, pointed out that while there is not a wide disparity of ages among the millennial set, continual advances in technology have led to behavioral differences among those consumers.

Consider this: When email became widely available in 1993, older millennials were 11 years old—but younger millennials were just 2 years old. “Those younger viewers really grew up more with technology as an ordinary part of their everyday lives,” Kim said.

During the VMAs, Facebook was the most popular social media brand, accounting for 41 percent of consumer usage, followed by Twitter with 32 percent. And while Cyrus’ antics burned up Twitter, performances by Justin Timberlake and Katy Perry had fans taking to Facebook to discuss.

“We know live TV is a place we need to be—it’s still incredible appointment viewing,” he said. “But it’s not enough for an advertiser to show up with a beautiful ad and wait for everyone to come to it.” - Chad Stubbs, senior director of marketing at PepsiCo

Stubbs said he thinks there was a good balance between the brand’s TV and online investment during the VMAs. But he would consider devoting more resources to monitoring social activity. He imagines a focus group that might include a comic, an industry insider, and key millennials and influencers in order to explore ways that the brand might respond to ultimate fans. “We know live TV is a place we need to be—it’s still incredible appointment viewing,” he said. “But it’s not enough for an advertiser to show up with a beautiful ad and wait for everyone to come to it.”

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