These Women Sought Inclusion at Lakmé Fashion Week

Women may come in all different shapes and sizes, but it’s safe to say the fashion and media worlds have barely scratched the surface in terms of representing such diverse ladies. So when Reliance Industries launched their online clothing portal AJIO at Lakmé Fashion Week, they chose some inspiring showstoppers to prove that fashion isn’t just exclusive to a cookie-cutter type of woman.
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IG’s Hatecopy Speaks to the South Asian Diaspora

As of 2015, there are 41 million foreign-born individuals living in the United States, of which the majority are from Latin America and Asia, with a small number arriving from Europe and Africa. Diasporas are more and more commonplace, with more people never feeling 100 percent connected to the place they live or the culture they come from. Toronto’s Maria Qamar, a daughter of Pakistani immigrants, has taken on the challenge of capturing the whimsical yet utterly real nuances of South Asian diasporic life in her hilarious Lichtenstein-inspired pieces.
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¿QUÉ BOLÁ CUBA? (What’s up, Cuba?)

In case you haven’t heard, President Barack Obama stepped foot on Cuban soil yesterday, making him the first sitting U.S. President to do so in 88 years. 88 years. This historic three-day visit to Cuba announced by Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro back in December 2014 marks the shift in diplomatic relations (from nonexistent to a questionable maybe).
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‘Silicon Valley’ Reflects the ‘F*cked Up’ Real World

The cast and executive producers of HBO’s ‘Silicon Valley’ hit up South by Southwest (SXSW) to promote the show’s upcoming Season 3 premiere. During the panel discussion, exec producer Alec Berg tackled the criticism directed at the show regarding the lack of diversity happening on screen.
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Modern Feminism, As Told By Emma Watson

Harry Potter actress, Emma Watson, is laudable for her continued achievements in acting, academics, and most profoundly her activism for gender equality since the wrap of Deathly Hallows Part 2. She helped launch HeForShe, which calls for men to advocate for gender equality, and her speech to the UN in September of 2014 regarding feminism has been viewed over 10 million times on YouTube. Last year, Time magazine named her one of the 100 most influential people in the world. From a child actress to an Ivy League graduate to a UN Women Global Goodwill ambassador at 24, Watson has grown into a role model worth following and deserves to be recognized in Women’s History Month.
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Political Issues Women REALLY Care About

Refinery29 and Fusion set out to discover what are the issues women voters really care about, and how are presidential candidates from both parties tackling them? They asked eight women across the political spectrum about the issues that matter most, and the candidates they feel they can trust.
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Hollywood from a Minority Perspective

The New York Times came out with an article today that featured interviews from 27 women and minority industry players in entertainment. The statistics are unequivocal: Women and minorities are vastly underrepresented in front of and behind the camera. Here are a few of their testimonials:
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The Prequel to #OscarsSoWhite is #HollywoodSoWhite

The Comprehensive Annenberg Report on Diversity (CARD) is the first of its kind and another major blow against Hollywood representation. As the most exhaustive analysis of film and television representation released today by the Media, Diversity and Social Change Initiative at USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, it portrays a sobering statistic of the entertainment industry’s gross lack of inclusion, no matter the media platform, from CEOs to minor characters.
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Grammys Under Fire for Lack of Diversity

During turbulent times of political and racial discourse and constant debates surrounding minority representation in the entertainment industry, it isn’t easy to ignore the stark contrast between the two headliners: “a white, blond woman whose music is shorn of any explicit political edge, vs. a black man whose newest music wears its jagged edges as badges of pride.” Taylor Swift (“1989”) and Kendrick Lamar (“To Pimp a Butterfly”) may be going head to head at the Grammys, but the awards show is facing the same type of criticism plaguing the Oscars.
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