Latino Urbanism During the Civil Rights Movement

During the time of the African-American Civil Rights Movement, Chicano culture was going through their own struggle for cultural identity. Originally it started in politics through protesting, but eventually evolved into public art.

Latino urbanism goes beyond creating great public spaces. It also includes cultural identity, which is shaped by needs, desires, and imagination.

Public housing projects, and other public buildings became the canvas for their artwork. Their artistic expression led to the influence of architecture throughout East Los Angeles.

The loss of manufacturing jobs in Los Angeles in the 1980s made Latino urban interventions economically driven. Street vendors roamed the streets and occupied sidewalks throughout Los Angeles. Day laborers hung around hardware stores. House workers would ride the buses across the greater Los Angeles area. Mariachis waited for gigs at a donut shop in Boyle Heights. Latinos began to reshape public space beyond East Los Angeles with these shadow interventions.

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